Bold Aspirations Visitor and Lecture Series

The Bold Aspirations Visitor and Lecture Series features presentations on KU's four strategic initiative themes by eminent guests and prominent KU talent. Participants in the series meet with the KU community and give a public lecture. The visits can range from 1–2 days to an entire semester or longer.

The series is a great opportunity to expose visitors to interesting work at KU and build collaborations.  The 2012 - 2013 Series featured 17 distinguished guests from across the United States as well as Great Britain, Denmark, and the Netherlands.

If you know of outstanding individuals for the Bold Aspirations series forward names, bios, and brief rationale to provost@ku.edu.

2013 - 2014 Series:

  • N. Katherine Hayles
    N. Katherine Hayles
    Duke University
    June 18, 2014 at 7:00 pm
    Conference Hall, Hall Center for the Humanities
    Cognition Everywhere: The Rise of the Cognitive Nonconscious
    more info …

    The cognitive nonconscious, a category of cognition that has been under-recognized and under-theorized in the humanities, has been shown to play a major role in activities previously thought to be the sole province of consciousness, affecting behavior, goals, priorities, and a host of other cognitive activities.  One of the major drivers of this change has been the growing power and pervasiveness of the cognitive nonconscious in a variety of philosophical, neurological, and technological constructions.   This talk will survey these developments and suggest how they dramatically affect our ideas of “interpretation,” its purposes and potentials.  

    N. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature and Director of Graduate Studies in Duke University’s Program in Literature. She has taught at Duke since 2008. Previously, she was the John Charles Hillis Professor of Literature at UCLA as well as Distinguished Professor of English and Design/Media Arts. Her monograph, How We Became Posthuman, won the 1998-99 Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory, awarded by the American Comparative Literature Association. Her other books include Chaos Bound: Orderly Disorder in Contemporary Literature (1990), Writing Machines (2002), My Mother Was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts (2005), and How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis (2012).

    Lecture co-sponsored by the Alice F. Holmes Summer Institute in the Department of English.

  • Deborah Blum
    Deborah Blum
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
    August 27, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    The Poisoner's Guide to Life
    more info …

    Deborah Blum is the Helen Firstbrook Franklin Professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is a faculty affiliate of the Science and Technology Studies program. A Pulitzer-prize winning science journalist, her articles and books explore the intersection between science and society, focusing on subjects ranging from animal research to forensic toxicology.

  • Akhil Datta-Gupta
    Akhil Datta-Gupta
    Texas A&M University
    September 5, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Bruckmiller Room, Adams Alumni Center
    Towards a Transparent Earth: Subsurface Flow and Transport Tomography
    more info …

    Dr. Akhil Datta-Gupta is Regents Professor and holder of the L.F. Peterson ’36 Chair in the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University. Dr. Datta-Gupta was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for developing the theory and practice of streamline simulation for fluid flow in heterogeneous reservoirs. The 3-D streamline simulation technology has been rapidly assimilated by the oil industry for highly detailed flow simulation, reservoir management, model calibration and uncertainty assessment. Dr. Datta-Gupta’s research interests include multiphase flow simulation techniques, reservoir optimization, large-scale parameter estimation via inverse methods and uncertainty quantification. He is recipient of the John Franklin Carll Award and the Lester C. Uren Award of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) for significant technical contributions in petroleum reservoir characterization and streamline-based flow simulation. He is an SPE Distinguished Member, Distinguished Lecturer, Distinguished Author, and recipient of the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences Award for outstanding contributions in geoscience research. His research program is funded by the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Energy and oil and gas companies world-wide.

  • Mark Rank
    Assets & Education Initiative 2013-14 Speaker Series
    Keynote Speaker Dr. Mark Rank
    September 11, 2013 at 12:00 pm
    Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union
    Shifting Our Understanding of American Poverty
    more info …

    Mark R. Rank is widely recognized as one of the foremost experts and speakers in the country on issues of poverty, inequality, and social justice. Dr. Rank’s areas of research and teaching have focused on poverty, social welfare, economic inequality, and social policy. His first book, "Living on the Edge: The Realities of Welfare in America," explored the conditions of surviving on public assistance, and achieved widespread critical acclaim. Professor Rank's most recent book, "One Nation, Underprivileged: Why American Poverty Affects Us All," provides a new understanding of poverty in America. His life-course research has demonstrated for the first time that a majority of Americans will experience poverty and will use a social safety net program at some point during their lives. He is currently working on a book with his long-time collaborator, Thomas Hirschl of Cornell University that explores various aspects of economic risk and turmoil across the adulthood years. Their research is designed to shed empirical light on the tenuous nature of the American Dream in today's society, and how to restore its relevance and vitality.

    In addition to writing books, Dr. Rank has published articles in numerous academic journals across a wide variety of fields. Professor Rank is the recipient of many awards including the Founders Day Distinguished Faculty Award from the Washington University Alumni Board of Governors, the Faculty Award to Improve Learning from the William T. Kemper Foundation, the Outstanding Research Award from the Society for Social Work and Research, the Feldman Award from the Groves Conference on Marriage and the Family, and the Outstanding Faculty Award from the Brown School’s Alumni Association.

    Dr. Rank's research has been reported in a wide range of media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, The Christian Science Monitor, The Chicago Tribune, USA Today, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and National Public Radio. He has provided his research expertise to members of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, as well as to many national and state organizations involved in issues of economic and social justice.

  • James Turrell
    James Turrell
    American Artist
    September 15, 2013 at 11:00 am
    Spencer Museum of Art, 309 Auditorium
    Conversation Featuring Artist James Turrell
    more info …

    Building on the momentum of three simultaneous Turrell retrospectives at major U.S. museums—the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston— the Spencer Museum exhibition provides local and regional art audiences with the rare opportunity to experience Turrell’s art close to home.

    For the past half century, Turrell, the pre-eminent light artist of our time, has worked directly with light and space to create artworks that engage viewers with the limits and wonder of human perception. Informed by his training in perceptual psychology and a childhood fascination with light, Turrell began experimenting with light as a medium in southern California in the mid-1960s and emerged as a leader of the West Coast’s avant-garde Light and Space Movement. Today, Turrell remains on the cutting edge.

  • David Roediger
    David Roediger
    University of Illinois
    September 24, 2013 at 7:00 pm
    Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union
    Emancipation from Below: The Jubilee Slaves Made and Freedom for All
    more info …

    David Roediger teaches history and African American Studies at the University of Illinois. He was born in southern Illinois and educated in public schools in that state, with a B.S. in Ed from Northern Illinois University. He completed a doctorate in History at Northwestern in 1979. Roediger has taught labor and Southern history at Northwestern, University of Missouri and University of Minnesota. He has also worked as an editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers at Yale University.

    He has written on U.S. movements for a shorter working day, on labor and poetry, on the history of radicalism, and on the racial identities of white workers and of immigrants. His books include Our Own Time , The Wages of WhitenessHow Race Survived U.S. History, and Towards the Abolition of Whiteness, all from Verso, Colored White (California), and Working Towards Whiteness (Basic). His edited books include an edition of Covington Hall's Labor Struggles in the Deep South (Kerr), and another of W.E.B. Du Bois's John Brown (Random House/Modern Library) as well as Black on White: Black Writers on What It Means to Be White (Schocken). The former chair of the editorial committee of the Charles H. Kerr Company, the world's oldest radical publisher, he has been active in the surrealist movement, labor support and anti-racist organizing.

  • Timothy Egan
    Timothy Egan
    Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and the author of six books
    September 26, 2013 at 7:30 pm
    Lied Center
    KU Common Book - An Evening with author Timothy Egan
    more info …

    Timothy Egan is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and the author of six books, most recently “The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America,” a New York Times bestseller and winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award and the Washington State Book Award. His previous books include “The Worst Hard Time,” which won a National Book Award and was named a New York Times Editors’ Choice. He is an online op-ed columnist for the New York Times, writing his "Opinionator" feature once a week. He is a third-generation Westerner and lives in Seattle. (Material provided by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

  • Avner Friedman
    Avner Friedman
    Distinguished University Professor, Ohio State University
    October 21, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Snow Hall, Aronszajn Seminar Room 306
    Mathematical Biology Models with Stokes Equations and Free Boundaries
    more info …

    Professor Friedman is a Distinguished University Professor. He received his PH.D. degree in 1956 from the Hebrew University. He served as the Director of the Institute for Mathematics and its Application at the University of Minnesota during 1987 – 1999, the Director of the Minnesota Center for Industrial Mathematics during the year 1994 – 2001, and the Director for Mathematical Biosciences Institute 2002 - 2008. A few of his honors include membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Matthew Pettway
    Matthew Pettway
    Langston Hughes Visiting Professor, Bates College
    October 23, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Kansas Room, Kansas Union
    Race, Religion and Ritual: Afro-Cuban Poets in the Age of Revolution
    more info …

    Dr. Pettway is the Fall 2013 Langston Hughes Professor and visiting in the Spanish and Portuguese Department where he is teaching two classes. Since 1977 the professorship has brought scholars in a range of disciplines to campus in honor of Langston Hughes, the African American writer who lived in Lawrence ages 1 to 12 (1903-1916). Professor Pettway is an Assistant Professor of Spanish at Bates College where he teaches classes and conducts research in Cuban Cultural Studies, Hispanophone Caribbean Literature and Nineteenth Century Latin American letters. He earned his Ph.D. in Hispanic Cultural Studies at Michigan State University. Professor Pettway’s research can be best described as a literary excavation of Afro-Cuban colonial literature that seeks to gather dispersed fragments of the past in order to define and reconstitute racial and religious subjectivities embedded in the text. His book-length project, Afro-Cuban Literature in a Society of Dead Poets: Race, Religion and Ritual in the Age of Revolution is an analysis of the politics of race and religion in the poetry, narrative, correspondence and trail records of Juan Francisco Manzano and Gabriel de la Concepción Valdés, the most prolific black literary writers in colonial Cuba. Dr. Pettway argues that black writers used Catholicism as subterfuge to inscribe an Afro-Caribbean religiosity that transculturated Cuban literature and posited a broad project of emancipation.

  • Robert J. Wuthnow
    Robert J. Wuthnow
    Princeton University
    October 30, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union
    Red State Religion: Conservative Resurgence in Kansas and Texas
    more info …

    Center Director (Ph.D., University of California , Berkeley) is the Gerhard R. Andlinger `52 Professor of Sociology. He has published widely in the sociology of religion, culture, and civil society. His publications include After the Baby Boomers: How Twenty- and Thirty-Somethings Are Shaping the Future of American Religion; America and the Challenges of Religious Diversity; and Saving America? Faith-Based Services and the Future of Civil Society; and Boundless Faith: The Global Outreach of American Churches. In 2013 he was elected to the American Philosophical Society.

  • David Nualart
    David Nualart
    University of Kansas
    November 6, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Bruckmiller Room, Adams Alumni Center
    Black-Babcock Distinguished Professor Lecture
    more info …

    David Nualart works in stochastic analysis. His research interests focus on the application of Malliavin calculus to a wide range of topics including regularity of probability laws, anticipating stochastic calculus, stochastic integral representations and central limit theorems for Gaussian functionals. His recent research deals with the stochastic calculus with respect to the fractional Brownian motion and related processes. Other fields of interest are stochastic partial differential equations, rough path analysis and mathematical finance.

  • David Miller
    David Miller
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center
    November 18, 2013 at 9:30 am
    Haworth Hall, Room 1005
    Genomic approaches to neuron morphogenesis and remodeling
    more info …

    The function of the nervous system depends on precisely defined patterns of connectivity. Despite the importance of this process, the biological rules governing neural specificity are poorly understood. What are the molecular cues that result in the creation of synapses between specific sets of neurons? The complexity of the vertebrate nervous system coupled with the dearth of biochemical information about synaptic choice have hindered efforts to answer this question in mammals. Our strategy to circumvent these problems is, first, to address this question in a simple, well-defined nervous system and, second, to employ a genetic approach which does not require prior assumptions about the molecular mechanism of neural specificity.

    In the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, the nervous system is composed of exactly 302 neurons. Every contact between these cells has been catalogued to construct a complete wiring diagram. With this detailed information in hand, it is possible to correlate mutations that produce abnormal or "uncoordinated" movement with specific changes in the structure of the nervous system. A mutation in one of these genes, the transcription factor unc-4, alters the pattern of synaptic input to one class of motor neurons in the ventral nerve cord and results in a strong movement defect. We hypothesize that unc-4 defines a specific motor neuron trait that is recognized by potential presynaptic partners and that these traits are encoded by downstream genes that unc-4 regulates. A major goal in the Miller lab is to identify these unc-4 target genes. Recently, we implemented a pioneering cell-specific profiling strategy to reveal one of these downstream genes, the transcription factor, CEH-12/HB9 (Von Stetina et al., 2007). Expression of CEH-12/HB9 in the vertebrate spinal cord suggests that the role of this pathway may be conserved in more complex motor circuits. Our long term aim is to work out the molecular and cellular mechanism of neural specificity in this simple model system and then to extend our findings to complex vertebrate nervous systems which could not otherwise be dissected by this genetic approach. Other projects in the Miller lab include mechanisms of neurodegeneration, synaptic plasticity, sensory neuron morphogenesis and a genome-wide effort to define the C. elegans transcriptome (modENCODE.org).

  • Matthias Groszer
    Matthias Groszer
    Laboratory for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the INSERM Institut du Fer à Moulin
    November 18, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Neurodevelopmental disorders - molecular perspectives
    more info …

    Matthias Groszer received his MD from the University of Berlin/Germany in 1998, followed by a clinical internship at the University Hospital Zurich/ Switzerland. From 2000 to 2004 he was a Postdoc in the Department of Molecular & Medical Pharmacology at UCLA studying the role of the phosphatase PTEN in brain development. In 2005 he joined the Laboratory for Molecular Neuroscience in Oxford/UK starting to work on the transcription factor Foxp2. In 2007 he became Independent Wellcome Trust Fellow in Oxford working on the transcription factor Tbr2 in neurodevelopment. Since 2008 he leads the Laboratory for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the INSERM Institut du Fer à Moulin in Paris/France.

  • Douglas Walker
    Douglas Walker
    University of Kansas
    November 20, 2013 at 5:30 pm
    Kansas Union, Kansas Room
    Adventures in Digital Geology – Trying to Make the Long Tail Shorter
    more info …

    Research interests in integration of Tectonics, Geochronology, and GIS to better understand the geologic development of contractile and extensional systems. The main problems Dr. Walker are pursuing are 1) The development of contractile belts in a backarc setting. This research focuses on the interaction of plutons with faulting along the backarc margin of arcs. 2) Response of the lithosphere to extensional deformation. This work is multifaceted in that it approaches lithospheric deformation from a field point of view as well as using isotope geochemistry to better understand the coupling of crustal deformation with responses of mantle melting in the subcrustal lithosphere and mantle. 3) GIS techniques in geology. My research in this area spans the gamut from developing software/hardware combinations for geologic mapping on laptops in the field to regional database development to solve tectonic problems.

  • Irena Lasiecka
    Irena Lasiecka
    University of Virginia
    December 3, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Snow Hall, Aronszajn Seminar Room 306
    Long time behavior of solutions to flow-structure interactions arising in modeling of subsonic and supersonic flows of gas
    more info …

    Irena Lasiecka obtained her M.S. and PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of Warsaw, Poland, in 1972 and 1975, respectively. Her research interests include Nonlinear PDEs, Optimization and Control Theory, Dynamical Systems and Numerical Analysis. She is the author of several books and review papers, and over 300 original research articles. Her first academic appointment was as an assistant professor at the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. Lasiecka has held a number of visiting positions during her career, both in the USA and in Europe. She has supervised about 20 PhD students and 10 postdoctoral fellows. Lasiecka has been given several awards for her research work, most recently the SIAM 2011 W.T. Idalia Prize for contribution to Differential Equations and Control Theory.

    Lecture Announcement

  • William Picking
    William Picking
    Oklahoma State University
    December 4, 2013 at 4:30 pm
    Adams Alumni Center, Bruckmiller Room
    Enteric Diseases: Our role in improving global public health
    more info …

    Bill Picking is a native Kansan who received his BS in Microbiology at Kansas State University in 1984. He then joined the graduate program in the Department of Microbiology at the University of Kansas where he worked with Dr. David Paretsky to study the obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii. After receiving his PhD in 1989, Dr. Picking joined the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas where he learned to apply spectroscopic methods to study the action of ribosomes in the laboratory of Dr. Boyd Hardesty. Dr. Picking’s first faculty appointment was at Saint Louis University in the Department of Biology where he first started to focus on the virulence mechanisms of the globally important enteric pathogen Shigella flexneri. He received his first NIH funding for this work in 1997 and he has been continuously funded by the NIH since then. He became a faculty member in the Department of Molecular Bioscience at KU in 1999 where he made major inroads into understanding the role of type III secretion systems in the pathogenesis of Shigella. In 2009, Dr. Picking joined the faculty at Oklahoma State University where he became Head of the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics. In five years at OSU, he has overseen a major transformation in the department with undergraduate enrollment increasing by nearly threefold, department extramural funding reaching an all time high for the past four years (elevating the department to number one in funding per FTE in the College of Arts and Sciences), and increases in graduate students enrolled and graduate student stipends. Dr. Picking has been committed to academic science at all levels throughout his career and his research on Shigella has led to breakthroughs that have contributed to understanding the regulation of type III secretion in Shigellaand numerous other important pathogens. This, in turn, has allowed the identification of potentially valuable targets for antimicrobial therapies and vaccine development.

  • David Roediger
    David Roediger
    University of Illinois
    December 5, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Disability, Emancipation, and the US Civil War
    more info …

    David Roediger teaches history and African American Studies at the University of Illinois. He was born in southern Illinois and educated in public schools in that state, with a B.S. in Ed from Northern Illinois University. He completed a doctorate in History at Northwestern in 1979. Roediger has taught labor and Southern history at Northwestern, University of Missouri and University of Minnesota. He has also worked as an editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers at Yale University.

    He has written on U.S. movements for a shorter working day, on labor and poetry, on the history of radicalism, and on the racial identities of white workers and of immigrants. His books include Our Own Time , The Wages of WhitenessHow Race Survived U.S. History, and Towards the Abolition of Whiteness, all from Verso, Colored White (California), and Working Towards Whiteness (Basic). His edited books include an edition of Covington Hall's Labor Struggles in the Deep South (Kerr), and another of W.E.B. Du Bois's John Brown (Random House/Modern Library) as well as Black on White: Black Writers on What It Means to Be White (Schocken). The former chair of the editorial committee of the Charles H. Kerr Company, the world's oldest radical publisher, he has been active in the surrealist movement, labor support and anti-racist organizing.

  • K. Christopher Beard
    K. Christopher Beard
    Carnegie Museum of Natural History
    December 10, 2013 at 9:30 am
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Into Africa: A Pivotal Step in Primate and Human Evolution
    more info …

    Chris Beard is Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, PA. Beard stewards one of the world’s largest collections of dinosaurs and fossil mammals and leads one of the most active vertebrate paleontological research groups in the nation. Beard received his PhD from the Functional Anatomy and Evolution Program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1989.

    Beard is a world-renowned expert on the primate fossil record and a 2000 MacArthur Fellowship “Genius” Award Winner. Beard's research is reshaping critical debates about the evolutionary origins of mammals, including primates, routinely questioning current thinking about their geographical origins. As a member and former Chair of the Media Liaison Committee for the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Beard is regularly featured in regional and national broadcast and print media, including National Public Radio, the Discovery Channel and Animal Planet, and popular and professional publications, among them National Geographic, Discover, andJournal of Vertebrate Paleontology. He has published numerous articles in leading academic journals, including Journal of Human Evolution, Nature, and Science.

    Beard’s popular book The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey: Unearthing the Origins of Monkeys, Apes and Humans was selected to receive the W.W. Howells Book Award from the Biological Anthropology Section of the American Anthropological Association and the 2005 Science Book Award from the Phi Beta Kappa Society. This fast-paced narrative full of vivid stories from the field demonstrates that the first anthropoids (the diverse group that includes monkeys, apes, and humans) evolved millions of years earlier than was previously suspected and emerged in Asia rather than Africa. Beard was also part of the research teams that discovered Teilhardina, the earliest primate ever found in North America, and Eosimias, one of the earliest higher primates yet discovered.

  • Edmund Russell
    Edmund Russell
    University of Kansas
    February 11, 2014 at 5:30 pm
    Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union
    Coevolutionary History
    more info …

    Russell's research synthesizes environmental history, American history, global history, history of technology, and science. His first major project focused on the environmental history of warfare. It culminated in a pair of books (War and Nature, Cambridge University Press, and Natural Enemy, Natural Ally, co-edited with Richard Tucker, Oregon State University Press). His second major project focused on evolutionary history, or the study of ways in which people have altered the traits of populations of non-human species and how these alterations have circled back to change human experience. He has published one book on this topic (Evolutionary History, Cambridge University Press) and has another under contract. A third area of interest is neurohistory, which draws on ideas from neuroscience to help us understand the past. He co-organized the first conference on neurohistory, edited proceedings of the conference, and collaborated on experiments with neuroscientists. Russell's research has received prizes in environmental history, history of technology, and history of science. He has received three teaching awards.

    Russell is co-editor of the Studies in Environment and History series for Cambridge University Press, distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians, life member of Clare Hall at Cambridge University, and extraordinary member of the Human Sciences Center of the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. He has been a Carson Fellow at the Rachel Carson Center in Munich and a visiting scholar at Cambridge University. He has served as conference program chair for the American Society for Environmental History, book review editor for Environmental History, executive council member for the Society for the History of Technology, and member of the United States National Committee for the International Union for the History and Philosophy of Science.

  • Yong Wang
    Yong Wang
    Washington State University
    February 17, 2014 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Innovations in catalysis and reaction engineering for thermal chemical conversion of biomass to chemicals/fuels
    more info …

    Yong Wang received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Washington State University in 1993. He joined PNNL in 1994 and was promoted to Laboratory Fellow in 2005 (highest scientific rank at PNNL). He led the Catalysis and Reaction Engineering Team from 2000 to 2007, and has served as the Associate Director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis (http://iic.pnl.gov) since 2008. In 2009, Dr. Wang assumed a joint position at Washington State University and PNNL. In this unique position, he continues to be a Laboratory Fellow and associate director of IIC at PNNL and is the first endowed professor in Chemical Engineering at WSU (Voiland Distinguished Professor), a full professorship with tenure. Dr. Wang is best known for both the fundamental and applied research in novel catalytic materials and reaction engineering for the conversion of fossil and biomass feedstocks to fuels and chemicals. Dr. Wang has authored more than 170 peer reviewed publications with H index >40, co-edited 2 books and 5 special journal issues, and given more than 100 invited presentations. He is the inventor on 228 issued patents including 88 issued U.S. patents (>90% of his patents are licensed to industries). His discoveries in microchannel reaction technologies led to the formation of Velocys, trading under the London Stock Exchange (VLS). He is a fellow of 4 major professional societies: AIChE (American Institute of Chemical Engineers), ACS (American Society of Chemistry), RSC (Royal Society of Chemistry), and AAAS (American Association of the Advancement of Science). He has won numerous awards including 2006 Asian American Engineer of the Year Award, Presidential Green Chemistry Award, 3 R&D 100 Awards, Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award from WSU, 2 PNNL Inventor of the Year Awards, Battelle Distinguished Inventor Award, and the first recipient of PNNL Laboratory Director’s Award for Exceptional Scientific Achievement Award. He is the past chair of the Energy & Fuel Division of the American Chemical Society, and currently serves editorial board of 7 catalysis and energy related journals including ACS Catalysis and Catalysis Today.

  • David Miller
    David Miller
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center
    February 24, 2014 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Decoding genetic programs that wire the brain
    more info …

    Dr. Miller earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg in 1973 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Rice University in Houston in 1981. As a postdoctoral fellow, he conducted an immunological and genetic analysis of nematode muscle assembly at Baylor College of Medicine, and he studied the structure and expression of C. elegans myosin heavy chain genes in the early 1980s as a visiting scientist under Nobel laureate Sydney Brenner at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology at Cambridge, England. He continued studying the molecular genetics of neural specificity in C. elegans as a young faculty member at North Carolina State University and Duke University before joining the faculty at Vanderbilt University as associate professor in the Department of Cell & Developmental Biology in 1994.

    The Miller lab uses the nematode C. elegans as a model organism to investigate neural development and function. Research topics include mechanisms of synaptic specificity, neuronal plasticity, sensory neuron morphogenesis and neurodegeneration. The goal of this work is to identify molecular pathways that control these events and to establish the cell biological mechanism of each process. In recognition of his contributions to fields of synaptic specificity and dendrite morphogenesis, Dr. Miller was recently named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

    The Miller lab has pioneered the use of genomic profiling technology (microarray and RNA-Seq) in collaborative projects to describe all active C. elegans genes (“The Transcriptome,” modENCODE.org). This work has lead to the identification of genes with key roles in specific C. elegans cells. Dr. Miller has acquired extensive experience with the approaches used in these studies including C. elegans genetics, high-resolution light microscopy, genomic analysis and protein biochemistry.

    In addition to his research accomplishments, Dr. Miller has been described by colleagues as “a luminary” when it comes to recruiting and training graduate students. He has mentored 14 graduate students in his laboratory, and continues to attract more students than he has space to accommodate. Since 1999, he also has served on 46 Ph.D. dissertation committees that awarded degrees to students outside his laboratory, and he currently serves on 12 others. He has served as an IMPACT group leader for the first-year Interdisciplinary Graduate Program (IGP), has represented the Department of Cell & Developmental Biology on the IGP Executive Committee, and was founding director of the Genetics and Development module of the IGP Bioregulations core course.

    Dr. Miller is a patient, rigorous and engaging teacher who gives his students the freedom to make mistakes. Under his careful guidance, they become confident presenters, skilled writers, proficient scientists, and leaders in their own right. Their papers are published in high-impact journals. Their posters are recognized at international meetings. Many have been awarded competitive fellowships from the NIH and the American Heart Association, and they have gone on to launch independent, highly productive careers. It is for these reasons that Dr. Miller has been chosen to receive the 2012 Elaine Sanders-Bush Award for Excellence in Teaching.

  • Mahdi Abu-Omar
    Mahdi Abu-Omar
    Purdue University
    February 25, 2014 at 3:30 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Sustainability through Catalysis Science: Making Biofuels and Chemicals from Biomass
    more info …

    Mahdi M. Abu-Omar completed his secondary education in Jerusalem, received his bachelor’s degree from Hampden-Sydeny College and his doctorate from Iowa State University. He held academic appointments at Caletch (as a postdoc) and UCLA prior to joining Purdue University in 2004, where he is currently R. B. Wetherill Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Chemical Engineering. His research areas include synthetic and mechanistic chemistry with a focus on transforming renewable resources to fuels and valuable chemicals.

  • Gary K. Wolfe
    Gary K. Wolfe
    Roosevelt University, Chicago
    March 10, 2014 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Asking the Next Question: Science Fiction and the Rational Imagination
    more info …

    Gary K. Wolfe is Professor of Humanities in Roosevelt University’s Evelyn T. Stone College of Professional Studies.  He has also served in various administrative capacities at the University since he began teaching here in 1971. His scholarly and critical work has focused on science fiction and other forms of fantastic literature, and for his work he has received the Pilgrim Award from the Science Fiction Research Association, the Distinguished Scholarship Award from the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts, the Eaton Award from the Eaton Conference on Science Fiction, theBritish Science Fiction Association Award for nonfiction (for his reviews collection Soundings and the World Fantasy Award for his critical writing. He has twice been nominated for the Hugo Award from the World Science Fiction Convention. Since 1992, he has written a monthly review column for LocusMagazine, and since summer of 2013 a regular science fiction review column for the Chicago Tribune‘s Printers Row. His most recent books areEvaporating Genres: Essays on Fantastic Literature, which received the 2012 Locus Award for nonfiction, and Sightings: Reviews 2002-2006. Since 2010, he has co-hosted a weekly podcast on science fiction with Australian editor Jonathan Strahan. The Coode Street Podcast was also nominated for four different awards in 2011 and Hugo Awards in 2012 and 2013.

    In September 2012 the Library of America published American Science Fiction: Nine Classic Novels of the 1950swhich Wolfe edited. He also curated a companion website for the two-volume boxed set.

  • Robert DeYoung
    Robert DeYoung
    University of Kansas
    March 11, 2014 at 5:30 pm
    Kansas Union, Big 12 Room
    What Should We Do About Too-Big-to-Fail Banks?
    more info …

    Professor DeYoung is a former FDIC official and Federal Reserve economist. He is currently president of the Southern Finance Association, serves on the faculty at the Barcelona Banking Summer School, and is co-editor of the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking. He frequently speaks to bankers, bank researchers and bank regulators in the U.S. and in Europe, and he has published more than 100 articles and essays on banking in academic journals and regulatory publications.

    He serves as the Capitol Federal Distinguished Professor in Financial Markets and Institutions at the University of Kansas School of Business.

  • James Bever
    James Bever
    Indiana University Bloomington
    March 13, 2014 at 4:00 pm
    Adams Alumni Center, Bruckmiller Room
    More than a Sea of Grass: Soil Microbes as Drivers of Prairie Plant Diversity and Productivity
    more info …

    Bever’s research focuses on testing basic ecological and evolutionary processes occurring within plants and their associated fungi. Much of the conceptual basis of ecology and evolution was developed with animals in mind. Plants and fungi differ from animals in important ways, including their motility, their nutrient acquisition systems and their genetic systems. Conceptual frameworks building on these peculiarities can be very useful in exploring the dynamics of populations and communities of plants and fungi. Developing, testing, and exploring the implications of these models and has been the goal of his work. He earned his PhD in 1992 from Duke University.

  • D. Kimbrough Oller
    D. Kimbrough Oller
    University of Memphis
    March 26, 2014 at 4:00 pm
    Adams Alumni Center, Bruckmiller Room
    Emergence of foundations for language
    more info …

    D. Kimbrough Oller is Professor and Plough Chair of Excellence in the School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Memphis and an external faculty member of the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research, Altenberg, Austria. He is author of over 200 articles in language and speech, as well as five books, most recently Evolution of Communicative Flexibility: Complexity, Creativity, and Adaptability in Human and Animal Communication. He was elected as Fellow of ASHA - American Speech-Language Hearing Association – in 2004 and received the award for distinguished contributions from the Council for Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders in 2003. His research interests include Infant vocal development, bilingualism, child phonology, evolution of language, and early speech communication.

  • Mary C. Hill
    Mary C. Hill
    U.S. Geological Survey
    March 27, 2014 at 4:00 pm
    Adams Alumni Center, Bruckmiller Room
    Recent Lessons about Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis in Environmental Modeling
  • Alvin Roth
    Alvin Roth
    Stanford University
    April 1, 2014 at 7:30 pm
    Lied Center
    Not for Sale! Repugnance as a Constraint on Markets
  • Sanjoy K. Mitter
    Sanjoy K. Mitter
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    April 4, 2014 at 4:00 pm
    Kansas Union, Kansas Room
    On Some Connections Between Nonlinear Filtering, Information Theory, and Statistical Mechanics
    more info …

    Sanjoy K. Mitter received his Ph.D. degree from the Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London, in 1965. He had previously worked as a research engineer at Brown Boveri & Co. Ltd., Switzerland (now ASEA Brown Boveri) and Battelle Institute in Geneva, Switzerland. He taught at Case Western Reserve University from 1965 to 1969. He joined MIT in 1969, first as a Visiting Professor and then in 1970 as Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and in 1973 as a Professor of Electrical Engineering. He was the Director of the MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems from 1981 to 1999 and Director of the Center for Intelligent Control Systems, an inter-university (Brown-Harvard-MIT) center for research on the foundations of intelligent systems from 1986-2000. He has held visiting positions at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay, India; Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy; Imperial College of Science and Technology; Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, France; University of Groningen, the Netherlands; ETH, Zürich, Switzerland and several universities in the United States including the University of California, Berkeley where he was the McKay Professor in March 2000, and held the Russell-Severance-Springer Chair in Fall 2003. He was awarded the AACC Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award for 2007. Professor Mitter was the Ulam Scholar at Los Alamos National Laboratories in April 2012 and the John von Neumann Visiting Professor in Mathematics at the Technical University of Munich, Germany from May-June 2012.

    Professor Mitter's research has spanned the broad areas of Systems, Communication and Control. Although his primary contributions have been on the theoretical foundations of the field, he has also contributed to significant engineering applications, notably in the control of interconnected power systems, character recognition, and automatic recognition and classification of electrocardiograms. His current research interests are theory of stochastic dynamical systems, nonlinear filtering, stochastic and adaptive control; mathematical physics and its relationship to system theory; image analysis and computer vision; and structure, function and organization of complex systems.

    Professor Mitter has served on several advisory committees and editorial boards for IEEE, SIAM, AMS, NSF and ARO. He is currently Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Mathematics and Optimization; Random and Computational Dynamics; Sankhya and the Ulam Quarterly and Editor-at-Large for Communications in Information and Systems. He is a fellow of the IEEE and was the recipient of the 2000 IEEE Control Systems Award. He was elected a Foreign Member of Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti in 2003. In 1988 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering.

  • Mariam Thalos
    Mariam Thalos
    University of Utah
    April 8, 2014 at 3:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    The gulf between practical and theoretical reasoning
    more info …

    Mariam Thalos teaches philosophy at the University of Utah. She writes on a broad spectrum of topics in philosophy of science, metaphysics, agency, reasoning, decision and political philosophy. She is currently working on two book projects: (1) a new theory of freedom and (2) planning and choice over time. Both are intended as contributions to our understanding of ourselves, and how we must proceed in pursuing our aspirations.

  • Peter Pecora
    Peter Pecora
    University of Washington
    August 2, 2012 at 4:00 pm
    Kansas Union
    Future Research and Funding Priorities in Child Welfare
    more info …

    Dr. Pecora has a joint appointment as the managing director of research services for Casey Family Programs and professor for the University of Washington School of Social Work. He has worked with a number of social service departments in the United States and in other countries to refine foster care programs, implement intensive home-based services, and design risk-assessment systems for child protective services.

    Working with faculty from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and University of Southern California (USC), he is evaluating community-based child-abuse prevention strategies in Los Angeles. Working with Walter R. McDonald and Associates, he is evaluating group-care reform in California. In 2007, he was appointed to the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Prevention of Mental Health Disorders and Substance Abuse to explore issues related to preventing mental disorders among children and young adults. His co-authored books and journal articles focus on child-welfare program design, administration and research.

  • Vladimir Vapnik
    Vladimir Vapnik
    Columbia University
    September 13, 2012 at 2:00 pm
    Nichols Hall, Apollo Auditorium, ITTC
    Learning with Nontrivial Teacher: Learning Using Privileged Information
    more info …

    Dr. Vladimir Vapnik is one of the two developers of Vapnik–Chervonenkis theory (or VC-theory). He also developed one of the most effective machine learning algorithms, the support vector machine which has been applied in a wide variety of contexts. He was inducted into the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 2006. He received the 2005 Gabor Award, the 2008 Paris Kanellakis Award, the 2010 Neural Networks Pioneer Award, the 2012 IEEE Frank Rosenblatt Award, and the 2012 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science. He was born in the Soviet Union. He received his master's degree in mathematics at the Uzbek State University, Samarkand, Uzbek in 1958 and Ph.D in statistics at the Institute of Control Sciences, Moscow in 1964. He worked at this institute from 1961 to 1990 and became Head of the Computer Science Research Department. At the end of 1990, he moved to the USA and joined the Adaptive Systems Research Department at AT&T Bell Labs in Holmdel, New Jersey. He left AT&T in 2002 and joined NEC Laboratories in Princeton, New Jersey, where he currently works in the Machine Learning group. Since 2003 he has held a position as Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, New York City and held a Professor of Computer Science and Statistics position at Royal Holloway, University of London. For over 30 years Professor Vapnik has contributed to computer science, theoretical and applied statistics. He has published several books and over a hundred research papers.

    Royal Holloway, University of London
    NEC Laboratories America, Inc.

  • H. George Frederickson
    H. George Frederickson
    Valedictory Public Administration Lecture Series
    September 18, 2012 at 3:30 pm
    Adams Alumni Center, Summerfield Room
    The Public in Public Administration
    more info …

    In his Valedictory Lecture Series, Frederickson claims that the practices of mod-ern public administration are far ahead of the devel-opment of theories that ex-plain those practices. He therefore reopens and re-considers core concepts and categories in public admin-istration, including the growing importance of the public in public administra-tion, the declining im-portance of government in public administration, and the urgent need to recon-ceptualize organization and management in public ad-ministration.

  • Maarten V. de Hoop
    Maarten V. de Hoop
    Purdue University
    September 24, 2012 at 4:00 pm
    Kansas Union, Malott Room
    Revealing Earth's interior: A geo-mathematical perspective
    more info …

    Maarten V de Hoop is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Purdue University. He received a B.Sc. in physics with mathematics and astronomy in 1981 at Utrecht University, an M.Sc. in theoretical physics in 1984 at Utrecht University, and a Ph.D. in technical sciences in 1992 at Delft University of Technology. His career began in industry, where he worked for Shell’s research lab in The Netherlands for seven years and Schlumberger’s research lab for three years. His academic career took him to Colorado School of Mines, MIT, and then to Purdue. Among other awards, he is the recipient of the Clarence Karcher Award of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

    His research expertise integrates Physics, Mathematics and the Geosciences. Research focus areas include: applied microlocal analysis; multi-dimensional imaging and inverse scattering; scattering theory in highly discontinuous and random media; multiscale methods and nonlinear theory of generalized functions; and acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic wave propagation modeling in anisotropic media. This research is applied to reflection seismology, global seismology, and geodynamics, focusing on the study of Earth's sedimentary basins, subduction, continental upper mantle, and deep mantle interfaces.

    Professor de Hoop is Director of Purdue University's Geo-Mathematical Imaging Group, which is an industry- and government-funded, multi-disciplinary, inter-institutional graduate education and research program. The group works to develop improved technology to meet the complex challenges of modern day oil and gas prospect evaluation, enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, and general geological study of the Earth's subsurface by expanding the boundaries of knowledge of seismic imaging, inverse scattering and tomography through collaborative scientific activities and breakthroughs.

  • Bob O’Neill
    Bob O’Neill
    International City/County Management Association
    September 26, 2012 at 5:30 pm
    KU Edwards Campus BEST Conference Center
    Unity, Disparity, Division: The Role of Local Government Managers
    more info …

    Robert J. O’Neill, Jr., is executive director of ICMA, the International City/County Management Association. Prior to joining ICMA in November 2002, O’Neill served as president of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) from January 2000 to November 2002. From May through September of 2001, O’Neill was on temporary assignment at the Office of Management and Budget as counselor to the director and deputy director on management issues.

    O’Neill graduated summa cum laude from Old Dominion University with a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1973. He received his master’s in public administration from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University in 1974, and in 2001, he received the institution’s highest honor, The Spirit of Public Service award. He is a 1984 graduate of The Executive Program of the Colgate Darden Graduate School of Business at the University of Virginia. In 1996 he was named recipient of the prestigious National Public Service Award presented by NAPA and the American Society for Public Administration. O’Neill was elected as a NAPA Academy Fellow in 1997 and was awarded an honorary doctorate of laws from Old Dominion University in 2000.

  • Spooner Hall
    Research Sharing Session for KU Faculty
    Featuring Six KU Faculty Members
    September 28, 2012 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    more info …

    In a continued effort to bring together scholars from all disciplines, and in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations, The Commons is introducing Research Sharing Sessions for KU Faculty.

    The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment will feature six faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

    All faculty are invited to attend. Refreshments to be provided.

    Presenters:
    Kris Ercums, Spencer Museum of Art
    Sara Gregg, History
    Kirsten Jensen, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
    Jay T. Johnson, Geography
    Ludwin Molina, Psychology
    Ben Rosenthal, Visual Art

  • Eula Biss
    Eula Biss
    Author of 2011 KU Common Book Notes from No Man's Land
    October 4, 2012 at 5:00 pm
    Kansas Union Ballroom
    more info …

    Eula Biss is the author of The Balloonists and Notes from No Man's Land. She holds a B.A. in nonfiction writing from Hampshire College and a M.F.A. in nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa. Her work on myth and metaphor in medicine is currently supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Howard Foundation Fellowship, and a NEA Literature Fellowship, and her writing has been recognized by a Jaffe Writers' Award, a 21st Century Award from the Chicago Public Library, a Pushcart Prize, and a National Book Critics Circle Award. Her essays have recently appeared in The Best American Nonrequired Reading, The Best Creative Nonfiction, and the Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Nonfiction as well as in The Believer, Gulf Coast,Columbia, Ninth Letter, the North American Review, the Iowa Review, theSeneca Review, and Harper's.

    (Material provided by Graywolf Press)

  • Sustainable Scholarship
    Sustainable Scholarship
    University of Kansas
    October 26, 2012 at 3:00 pm
    Center for Design Research, 2544 Westbrooke Circle
    more info …

    Join us for a symposium focused on sustainability-related research at KU, featuring presentations that span the Bold Aspirations strategic initiative themes.

    Presenters include:
    Belinda Sturm - Civil, Environmental & Architectural Engineering
    Vicki Collie-Akers - Bureau of Child Research
    Dennis Domer - Architecture, Design & Planning
    Paul Atchley - Department of Psychology
    Derek Reed - Applied Behavioral Science
    Chris Depcik - Mechanical Engineering
    Stephen Goddard - Spencer Museum of Art

    Space at the Center for Design Research is limited. The facility is accessible via Transit Routes 10 and 30. See www.lawrencetransit.org/pages/routes for information. Please feel free to come and go throughout the event. Refreshments will be provided.

  • Dorthe Dahl-Jensen
    Dorthe Dahl-Jensen
    University of Copenhagen
    November 1, 2012 at 5:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Greenland Ice Cores Inform on Past Warm Climate Periods
    more info …

    Dorthe Dahl-Jensen is professor of ice physics at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen. She heads the university’s Centre for Ice and Climate, where researchers focus on ice core data to understand the climate of the past, present, and future. She also manages North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling, the Danish International Polar Year’s ice core drilling program on the Greenland ice sheet.

  • Alfredo Artiles
    Alfredo Artiles
    Arizona State University
    November 15, 2012 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Intersectionality in research on the racialization of disability: An interdisciplinary critique
    more info …

    Dr. Artiles is Professor of Culture, Society, and Education in the School of Social Transformation, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences at Arizona State University. His interdisciplinary scholarship examines the ways cultural practices and ideologies of difference mediate school responses to students' needs. His research also focuses on teacher learning for social justice. Dr. Artiles has published extensively for research, policy, and practice audiences in education, psychology, and related disciplines.

    Dr. Artiles is Vice President of the American Educational Research Association's (AERA) Division on the Social Contexts of Education (2009-2011), an ERA Fellow, a Spencer Foundation/National Academy of Education Postdoctoral Fellow, and a Resident Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford University).

  • Sir Robert Worcester
    Sir Robert Worcester
    KBE, DL, KU alum, and founder of the MORI polling organization
    November 29, 2012 at 9:00 am
    Hall Center Conference Hall
    Why America Reelected a Black Liberal in 2012, or Not
    more info …

    Sir Robert Worcester is the Founder of MORI (Market & Opinion Research International), London. He is a Past President of the World Association for Public Opinion Research (WAPOR). In 2005 he was appointed by Her Majesty the Queen a Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE) in recognition of the "outstanding services rendered to political, social and economic research and for contribution to government policy and programmes".

    Sir Robert is Chancellor of the University of Kent. He is Visiting Professor of Government at the London School of Economics and Political Science and at the Institute of Contemporary British History at King's College London. He is a Governor of LSE. He is Honorary Professor at Kent and Warwick. For twelve years he was Visiting Professor at City University in the Graduate School of Journalism and subsequent to that Visiting Professor at the University of Strathclyde in the School of Business.

    A Kansas City native, Sir Robert graduated from the University of Kansas in 1955.

  • Sir Robert Worcester
    Sir Robert Worcester
    KBE, DL, KU alum, and founder of the MORI polling organization
    November 29, 2012 at 7:30 pm
    Dole Institute
    The Relevance of the Magna Carta to the 21st Century
    more info …

    Sir Robert Worcester is the Founder of MORI (Market & Opinion Research International), London. He is a Past President of the World Association for Public Opinion Research (WAPOR). In 2005 he was appointed by Her Majesty the Queen a Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE) in recognition of the "outstanding services rendered to political, social and economic research and for contribution to government policy and programmes".

    Sir Robert is Chancellor of the University of Kent. He is Visiting Professor of Government at the London School of Economics and Political Science and at the Institute of Contemporary British History at King's College London. He is a Governor of LSE. He is Honorary Professor at Kent and Warwick. For twelve years he was Visiting Professor at City University in the Graduate School of Journalism and subsequent to that Visiting Professor at the University of Strathclyde in the School of Business.

    A Kansas City native, Sir Robert graduated from the University of Kansas in 1955.

  • Wim Jiskoot
    Wim Jiskoot
    Leiden University
    December 17, 2012 at 11:00 am
    School of Pharmacy, Room 2020
    Unwanted Immunogenicity of Therapeutic Proteins
    more info …

    Wim Jiskoot graduated as a pharmacist in 1987 and received his PhD degree in 1991 at Utrecht University on pharmaceutical aspects of monoclonal antibodies. As a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Utah (1991-1993) he studied protein-ligand interactions using biophysical techniques. From 1994-1998 he was head of the Department of Bacterial Vaccine Development at the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven. In 1998 he became a staff member at the Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht University, where he focused his research on formulation and physicochemical characterization of therapeutic proteins and vaccines. In March 2006 he was appointed as full professor at the Division of Drug Delivery Technology, LACDR, and as the coordinator of the Biologics Research Platform Leiden (BRPL). His current research is concentrated on two themes: (1) formulation and unwanted immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins and (2) vaccine delivery.

  • Robert C. Merton
    Robert C. Merton
    Nobel Laureate & Financial Economist
    February 15, 2013 at 1:00 pm
    Dole Institute of Politics
    A Next-Generation Solution for Funding Retirement: A Case Study in Design and Implementation of Financial Innovation
    more info …

    Merton received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1997 for his work on the Black-Scholes-Merton model for pricing options. This model remains one of the best ways to determine the value of derivative securities, and it is considered one of the most important concepts in modern financial theory.

  • H. George Frederickson
    H. George Frederickson
    Valedictory Public Administration Lecture Series
    February 19, 2013 at 3:30 pm
    Kansas Union, Pine Room
    Bureaucrats without Borders: Public Management and the End of Geography
    more info …

    In his Valedictory Lecture Series, Frederickson claims that the practices of modern public administration are far ahead of the development of theories that explain those practices. He therefore reopens and reconsiders core concepts and categories in public administration, including the growing importance of the public in public administration, the declining importance of government in public administration, and the urgent need to reconceptualize organization and management in public administration.

  • Chuanbin Mao
    Chuanbin Mao
    University of Oklahoma
    March 7, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Genetically Engineering BioNanostructures to Develop NanoBiotechnology and Nanomedicine
    more info …

    Chuanbin Mao is currently an Edith Kinney Gaylord Presidential Professor at the University of Oklahoma. His group exploits the use of genetically modifiable bionanostructures in the development of nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. In the recent years, his group has studied three natural bionanostructures related to bacteria including phage, flagella and pili. His talk will focus on the genetic engineering of these bionanostructures and their integration with functional abiotic nanomaterials for nano/bio-materials synthesis/assembly, cancer and stem cell targeting, tumor tissue homing, cancer imaging and treatment, stem cell-based therapy, drug/gene delivery, and tissue regeneration.

  • Geraldine Richmond
    Geraldine Richmond
    University of Oregon
    March 27, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    Doorman, Barrier or Temptress: What Role Does a Water Surface Play in Gaseous Uptake?
    more info …

    Geraldine Richmond is the Richard M. and Patricia H. Noyes Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Oregon. Richmond received her bachelor's degree in chemistry from Kansas State University (1975) and her Ph.D. in chemical physics at the University of California, Berkeley (1980) where she worked under the mentorship of Prof. George Pimentel. She has distinguished herself in her research using nonlinear optical spectroscopy and computational methods applied to understanding the chemistry that occurs at complex surfaces and interfaces that have relevance to important problems in energy production, environmental remediation, atmospheric chemistry and biomolecular surfaces. Over 160 publications have resulted from this research. Recent awards for her scientific accomplishments include the American Chemical Society Garvan Medal (1996), the Oregon Scientist of the Year by the Oregon Academy of Science (2001), the Spectrochemical Analysis Award of the American Chemical Society (2002), the Spiers Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2004), a Guggenheim Fellowship (2007) and the Bomem-Michaelson Award (2008). She has been selected as a fellow of the American Physical Society (1993), the American Association of the Advancement of Science (2004), the Association of Women in Science (2008), and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006).

    Richmond has also played an important role in setting the national scientific agenda through her service on many science boards and advisory panels. Most recent appoinments include Associate Editor of Annual Reviews of Physical Chemistry (2006-2008), Chair of the Science Advisory Committee of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (2006-2008), Chair of the Chemistry Section, Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) (2009-2010), Chair of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Board of the Department of Energy (1998-2003) and as a governor appointee to the State of Oregon Board of Higher Education where she served as a member, Vice President and interim President over her seven year term (1999-2006). She has testified on science issues before committees in the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives and the Oregon House of Representatives.

    She is the founder and chair of COACh (Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists), an organization assisting in the advancement of women faculty in the sciences. Over 3000 science faculty, students, postdocs and administrators have benefitted from professional training and networking workshops developed by COACh. She has been honored for these efforts and related efforts on women in science by the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Engineering Mentoring (1997), the American Chemical Society Award for Encouraging Women in the Chemical Sciences (2005) the Council on Chemical Research Diversity Award (2006).

  • Samir Mitragotri
    Samir Mitragotri
    University of California, Santa Barbara
    April 1, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    School of Pharmacy, room 3020
    Advanced Healthcare Technologies: From Engineering Foundations to Clinical Translation
    more info …

    Professor Samir Mitragotri is a Professor of Chemcial Engineering at the Univesity of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). He also serves as the founding director of UCSB’s Center for Bioengineering. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in 1996 and B.S. from Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai in 1992. Prof. Mitragotri’s research interests are in the field of drug delivery and biomaterials. His research has advanced fundamental understanding of transport processes in biological systems and led to the development of new materials as well as technologies for diagnosis and treatment of various ailments including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. His research has made particular impact on the following areas:

    • Transdermal drug delivery
    • Oral drug delivery
    • Polymeric materials for drug delivery
    • Synthetic Cells
  • J. Bradley DeLong
    J. Bradley DeLong
    University of California, Berkeley
    April 8, 2013 at 10:45 am
    Kansas Union, Big 12 Room
    Fiscal Policy in Depressed Economies: Further Thoughts
    more info …

    Brad DeLong is a professor of economics at U.C. Berkeley, chair of the Political Economy of Industrial Societies major, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was educated at Harvard University, where he received his PhD in 1987. He joined UC Berkeley as an associate professor in 1993. He became a full professor in 1997. Professor DeLong also served in the U.S. government as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy from 1993 to 1995. He worked on the Clinton Administration's 1993 budget, on the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, on the North American Free Trade Agreement, on macroeconomic policy, and on the unsuccessful health care reform effort. Before joining the Treasury Department, Professor DeLong was Danziger Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Harvard University. He has also been a John M. Olin Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and Assistant Professor of Economics at Boston University, and a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at M.I.T.

  • H. George Frederickson
    H. George Frederickson
    Valedictory Public Administration Lecture Series
    April 16, 2013 at 3:30 am
    Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium
    Administration in Public Administration
    more info …

    In his Valedictory Lecture Series, Frederickson claims that the practices of modern public administration are far ahead of the development of theories that explain those practices. He therefore reopens and reconsiders core concepts and categories in public administration, including the growing importance of the public in public administration, the declining importance of government in public administration, and the urgent need to reconceptualize organization and management in public administration.

  • Anne Basting
    Anne Basting
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
    April 18, 2013 at 11:00 am
    Spooner Hall, The Commons
    The Promise of Improvisational Health Ensembles: Stories from the Junction of Arts, Science, and Aging
    more info …

    Anne Basting coordinates the Playwriting and Applied Theatre efforts in the department. With a PhD in Theatre Studies from University of Minnesota, Basting is both a creative artist (writing and producing applied theatre projects) and scholar. Her creative and scholarly work focus on bringing the transformative potential of theatre to health care settings, particularly to frail elders living in long term care. She is the author of two books, including Forget Memory: Creating better lives for people with dementia (2009, Johns Hopkins UP), and dozens of articles and essays in a wide range of journals. Basting is the recipient of a Rockefeller Fellowship, a Brookdale National Fellowship and numerous major grants for her scholarly and creative endeavors. She is currently at work on the Penelope Project, a collaboration with Sojourn Theatre, Luther Manor Health Center, and the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging. Basting is also the Director of UWM's Center on Age & Community, in which she links students and scholars with those in the community to improve the lives of older adults.

  • Anne Basting
    Anne Basting
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
    April 18, 2013 at 4:00 pm
    Visitor Center
    The Cultural Cure for Dementia
    more info …

    Anne Basting coordinates the Playwriting and Applied Theatre efforts in the department. With a PhD in Theatre Studies from University of Minnesota, Basting is both a creative artist (writing and producing applied theatre projects) and scholar. Her creative and scholarly work focus on bringing the transformative potential of theatre to health care settings, particularly to frail elders living in long term care. She is the author of two books, including Forget Memory: Creating better lives for people with dementia (2009, Johns Hopkins UP), and dozens of articles and essays in a wide range of journals. Basting is the recipient of a Rockefeller Fellowship, a Brookdale National Fellowship and numerous major grants for her scholarly and creative endeavors. She is currently at work on the Penelope Project, a collaboration with Sojourn Theatre, Luther Manor Health Center, and the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging. Basting is also the Director of UWM's Center on Age & Community, in which she links students and scholars with those in the community to improve the lives of older adults.

  • Liang-Shih Fan
    Liang-Shih Fan
    The Ohio State University
    April 30, 2013 at 11:00 am
    Kansas Union, Kansas Room
    Chemical Looping Technology
    more info …

    L.-S. Fan is Distinguished University Professor and C. John Easton Professor in Engineering in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Ohio State University. He has been on the faculty of Chemical Engineering at Ohio State since 1978 and served as Department Chair from 1994 – 2003. Professor Fan received his B.S. (1970) from National Taiwan University, and his M.S. (1973) and Ph.D. (1975) from West Virginia University, all in Chemical Engineering.  In addition, he earned an M.S. (1978) in Statistics from Kansas State University.

    Professor Fan’s expertise is in fluidization and multiphase flow, powder technology and energy and environmental reaction engineer­ing. He is an inventor of 7 industrially viable clean fossil conversion processes : OSCAR, CARBONOX, PH Swing, CCR, Calcium Looping, Syngas and Coal-Direct Chemical Looping Processes. These processes control sulfur, nitrogen oxide and carbon dioxide emissions and convert carbonaceous fuels to hydrogen, electricity or liquid fuels. He also invented the electrical capacitance volume tomography for 3-dimensional, real time multiphase flow imaging that is currently being used in academia and industry. Professor Fan is the U.S. Editor of Powder Technology and has served as a consulting editor of ten other journals and book series, including the AIChE Journal, I&EC Research,and the International Journal of Multiphase Flow.  He has authored or co-authored four books, 370 journal papers, and 39 patents. 

    Professor Fan has received a number of awards in recognition of his research and teaching including the ACS E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, AIChE Alpha Chi Sigma Award for Chemical Engineering Research, ASEE Dow Lectureship Award in Chemical Engineering, CCR Malcolm Pruitt Award and The Ohio State University  Charles E. MacQuigg Award for Outstanding Teaching and Joseph Sullivant Medal for Distinguished Teaching, Research and Service. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the AIChE, a member of the U. S. National Academy of Engineering, a Corresponding Member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences, an Academician of Academia Sinica, and a Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Engineering. Professor Fan was named in 2008 as one of the “One Hundred Engineers of the Modern Era” by the AIChE.

Bold Aspirations

Bold Aspirations is the strategic plan for KU, comprising individual plans for the following:

Office of the Provost
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Did you know KU is one of the first universities in the country to add Somali language training courses to its curriculum? The addition of theses courses meets the need of the growing Somali-speaking population in our area. http://bit.ly/1kAusbG Tags: #KUcommunities #KUstudents #Somali #Language #HigherEd
Inside KU: Military language training, bullying, arthritis and KU's Panorama "Inside KU" explains how a Department of Defense grant is helping to provide real-world language training to military personnel soon to be deployed around the world. Learn more about KU Graduate Military Programs at (http://bit.ly/1rZHgAh). Also: KU researchers are working with Kansas schools to develop policies to stop bullying (See http://bit.ly/1jvhpxL). Bioengineering students at KU work on a potential treatment for arthritis (See KU-BERC at http://bit.ly/W1zAR5). The historic Panorama in KU's Natural History Museum is being expertly preserved (See http://bit.ly/1mPqJNd). The Time Warner Cable Sports Network's "Inside KU" is hosted by Jeannie Hodes.


Green Office

Why KU
  • One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
  • 26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
  • Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
  • 1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
    —U.S. News & World Report
  • 46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
    —U.S. News & World Report
  • Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
    —ALA
  • $260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
  • 23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times