First-Year Seminars

First-Year Seminars (FYS) are 3-credit hour courses developed for freshmen. They are taught by faculty and focus on thought-provoking and innovative topics that capitalize on the faculty member’s expertise. During the 2011-2012 academic year, a steering committee of faculty, staff, and students designed the FYS program and developed the pilot seminars for Fall 2012. Members of the steering committee are currently teaching pilot First-Year Seminar courses. For more information, please review the detailed FYS steering committee work plan for Spring 2012 and committee roster.


FYS Program Objectives:

The FYS program is a cornerstone of KU’s plan to invest in first-year experiences that promote student engagement in the intellectual life of the university (Goal 1C in Bold Aspirations). FYS courses are designed to introduce students to intellectual discovery and scholarly inquiry at the university, develop and inspire students’ own intellectual curiosity, and foster critical thinking and learning skills. The goal is to lay a strong foundation for lifelong learning and inquiry to serve our students in their academic and professional careers. FYS also create early connections between students and faculty members.


FYS Course Guidelines:

  • Enrollment in each First-Year Seminar is limited to 19 freshmen students.
  • There are no prerequisites for FYS; therefore they should be designed for students from any discipline who have an interest in the topic.
  • FYS classes promote active learning, discussion, and engagement with peers.
  • All FYS are designed around the critical thinking goal and learning outcome for the KU Core. See kucore.ku.edu.
  • FYS course assignments also emphasize written communication skills.
  • FYS courses are organized around applied problems and expose students to hands-on or experiential learning opportunities.
  • FYS courses include a capstone assignment and a plan for gauging students’ achievement of learning outcomes on this assignment.
  • FYS courses include library training and promote collaborations with other units on campus.
  • Interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary courses, or cross-course connections between individual FYS, are encouraged.

First-Year Seminar Steering Committee Roster:

  • Andrea Greenhoot (chair) - Psychology
  • Jill Becker - Libraries
  • Robert Bayliss – Spanish & Portuguese
  • Sarah Crawford-Parker – Provost’s Office
  • Chuck Epp – Public Affairs & Administration
  • David Fowle – Geology
  • Lisa Friis – Mechanical Engineering
  • Alison Gabriel - Linguistics
  • John Gronbeck-Tedesco – Theatre
  • Dennis Karney - Business
  • Deron McGee – Music
  • Haley Miller - Student
  • Milena Stanislavova – Mathematics
  • Mike Williams - Journalism
  • Nathan Wood - History
Bold Aspirations

Bold Aspirations is the strategic plan for KU, comprising individual plans for the following:

Policy Library Search

Visit the Policy Office for more information.

This week, we featured Sukhindervir Sandhu and how he is using an undergrad research award to make discoveries. What exactly is he researching? Watch this video to learn how Sandhu is using virus-induced gene silencing to make plants act differently. Tags: #KUdiscoveries #KUresearch #Plants #Genes #Biology

KU student tricks monkey flower into growing protective ‘hair’ Thanks to a KU Undergraduate Research Award (see more at http://ugresearch.ku.edu/student/fund/ugra), Sukhindervir Sandhu, a KU junior in biochemistry, figured out which genetic button to push to get a monkey flower, or Mimulus guttatus, to grow protective trichomes, or plant hair. Sandhu was able to track it down to a gene called SKP-1. By silencing SKP-1, he discovered that gene regulates plant hair growth in monkey flowers.


Green Office

Why KU
  • One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
  • 26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
  • Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
  • 1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
    —U.S. News & World Report
  • 46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
    —U.S. News & World Report
  • Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
    —ALA
  • $260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
  • 23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times