The Chancellor's Task Force Reports

In November 2009, Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little created three task forces to identify strategies for advancing the University of Kansas in the areas of research, admissions, and retention and graduation. You can read more about the mission of these task forces in her message to campus announcing the initiative.

  • Research Drawing upon the recommendations of the Research Task Force, the university plans to take steps to remove barriers and create more incentives for faculty to conduct research and undertake scholarly and creative activities. The effort will include creating a university-wide system to measure scholarlship that takes into consideration diverse activities across academic fields, from the traditional measure of citations in research journals to creative scholarship and performance. Our goal is to enhance the impact of faculty work over the long term, regardless of discipline.
  • Admissions The recruitment of talented students is a deciding factor in the success of the University of Kansas. The Admissions Task Force identified a number of admissions and recruitment challenges that KU faces as it seek ways to ensure that qualified students — especially from Kansas — choose to attend KU. Ultimately, admissions standards are set by the Board of Regents. KU will continue to consult with the Board of Regents and work with state partners to ensure a more rigorous high school experience for prospective students, consistent with the Board of Regents recommendations. We will continue to pursue our goal of admitting more prepared students, with a key priority for the year to identify more ambitious strategies of recruitment.
  • Retention & Graduation The Retention and Graduation Task Force recommended both fundamental and instrumental changes to enhance KU’s efforts to successfully recruit and retain students, provide them with outstanding educational opportunities, and celebrate their timely graduation. Fundamental strategies will include examining and refreshing the curriculum as well as expanded roles for students in research and community engaged scholarship. Instrumental changes will include adjustments in policies, practices, and tools to address specific challenges, such as an early warning system that will alert officials when a student seems to be struggling academically. Chris Haufler, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, who chaired the retention and graduation task force, will work with the provost to develop strategies to address these recommendations.
Bold Aspirations

Bold Aspirations is the strategic plan for KU, comprising individual plans for the following:

Policy Library Search

Visit the Policy Office for more information.

David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


Green Office

Why KU
  • One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
  • 26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
  • Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
  • 46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
    —U.S. News & World Report
  • Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
    —ALA
  • 23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times